ironed_orchid: (wild thing)
[personal profile] ironed_orchid posting in [community profile] bitesizedreading
What have you been reading today? Everything counts, from the user's manual to the back of the cereal box!

Date: 2017-01-19 11:26 am (UTC)
bonnefois: ghost_factory @ LJ (Default)
From: [personal profile] bonnefois
I finished Breaker's Passion by Julie Cannon yesterday morning. Another one for the box of books to send my friend. :)
Edited Date: 2017-01-19 11:26 am (UTC)

Date: 2017-01-19 01:15 pm (UTC)
nanila: me (Default)
From: [personal profile] nanila
Did some reading in bed last night, and am now about halfway through The Rhesus Chart by C. Stross.

Date: 2017-01-19 07:54 pm (UTC)
nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)
From: [personal profile] nou

Since last report, I have read:

  • Under The Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta. It took me a couple of tries to get into this, for some reason — the first chapter just wasn’t going in, no matter how hard I tried to focus, but I’m glad I perservered.
  • Horrible Words: A Guide To The Misuse Of English by Rebecca Gowers. This was pretty interesting, though I found the framing story (“this is a guide to annoying pedants”) a bit irritating. Having said that, it is right there in the title, so I shouldn’t complain.
  • Longthroat Memoirs: Soups, Sex And Nigerian Tastebuds by Yemisi Aribisala. A collection of essays on Nigerian food and other subjects that food brings to the author’s mind. It’s a very personal collection, and at some points reveals more about the author than she perhaps intended (apparently she doesn’t realise that not all non-heterosexuals are gay men), but due to its nature as a compilation it’s easy enough to skip to the next essay if one of them isn’t working for you. The food parts are great, though.
  • Things Fall Apart and Arrow Of God by Chinua Achebe. The first was a re-read, the second new to me. Both reads were partly inspired by having recently read two other very different Nigerian books, as noted above. There’s a really interesting comment by Ainehi Edoro in a discussion with the author of Longthroat Memoirs, which I didn’t see until after reading all of this, but with which I totally agree: “I like using Things Fall Apart as the classic example of a novel that we credit with so much representational value but that almost completely excludes the question of food. There are the usual references to people cooking and eating mounds of pounded yam and roasted cricket but nothing memorable, nothing like Pip in Dicken’s Great Expectation going and on about godawful bread his sister forced him and her husband to eat.”
  • An Accident Of Stars by Foz Meadows. I loved how bisexuality and polyamory were just part of the world, nothing special, and I liked the differing viewpoints throughout the book. I did feel the ending was a bit rushed and implausible, but I’ll definitely read the next one in the series once it’s out.

Date: 2017-01-19 07:54 pm (UTC)
nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)
From: [personal profile] nou
A question: would people prefer me to be more concise about making reports here? I realise the above is a bit “wall of text”.

Date: 2017-01-20 08:28 am (UTC)
fred_mouse: cross stitched image reading "do not feed the data scientists" (Default)
From: [personal profile] fred_mouse
I am happy with your Wall'o'Text - I find it interesting to read your commentaries as well as just get the names.

Date: 2017-01-20 05:57 pm (UTC)
nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)
From: [personal profile] nou
Thank you!

Date: 2017-01-20 05:58 pm (UTC)
nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)
From: [personal profile] nou
Great, thanks :)

Date: 2017-01-20 05:58 pm (UTC)
elynross: (Default)
From: [personal profile] elynross
I enjoyed reading what you liked/didn't like, which is much more likely to spur me to take a look at something myself, so I'd love for you to continue!

Date: 2017-01-20 05:59 pm (UTC)
nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)
From: [personal profile] nou
Thank you — glad to hear people find it useful rather than annoying!

Date: 2017-01-20 08:32 am (UTC)
fred_mouse: cross stitched image reading "do not feed the data scientists" (Default)
From: [personal profile] fred_mouse
I am very slowly making progress through 'The Future Eaters' by Tim Flannery. I've finished the first section, on the what the fossil record and the current set of species mix tells us about Australia, New Zealand, and Papua New Guinea. I found it weirdly over-personal, and sometimes self-congratulatory on the part of the author (who I gather is a palaeontologist). But there is a lot of interesting detail as well.

Date: 2017-01-22 06:00 am (UTC)
fred_mouse: cross stitched image reading "do not feed the data scientists" (Default)
From: [personal profile] fred_mouse
I'm beginning to think that working in research has spoiled me for science books, because I spend so much time distracted by the writer that I miss details of the science. This one - there are interesting details, but they are going in and straight out the back of my head, because I'm just not remembering them from one reading session to the next.

Date: 2017-01-20 06:12 pm (UTC)
elynross: (Default)
From: [personal profile] elynross
This is my first post, so it's a bit more than I've read today, but I did read bits of all of these within the last day or so:

I just finished The Writing Dead: talking terror with TV's top horror writers, 13 interviews with writers from shows like XF, WD, Hannibal, Buffy, etc. It was interesting, with standard questions like how did you get into genre, have you always been a horror fan, best crit you've gotten, and then more show-specific queries. Fairly shallow and brief, but also a quick read.

Working on Karen Armstrong's "The Great Transformation", which covers the development of Judaism, Greek thought, Hinduism, and Confucianism prior to the so-called Axial Age of their peak influence. She often presents things as total fact that I suspect are interpretations, but she has a knack for assimilating a lot of information (nicely endnoted) and developing patterns that is fascinating to me, and shows both trends across spiritual paths and the seeds of later developments.

Almost done with Thomas Merton's What is Contemplation, a short concise exploration of mystical contemplation and the whys and wherefores that he goes into in greater length in other works.

And for my ongoing fiction reading I am rereading the entire In Death series by JD Robb/Nora Roberts. I picked up the latest one in December, realized I'd missed the one just previous, and was still in the mood when I was done with both those, so I'm now 32 books/stories in to the 54 book/story series. *kof* As this amply demonstrates, they're very quick reads, not much over 120-130 pages apiece for the books, and especially when you skip the sex scenes, as I'm mostly doing this time around. *g* Nearish future murder mysteries, with fun characters and basically sound writing, as well as droids, flying cars, and what are essentially ST holodecks and replicators!

And I'm getting ready to read this sestina, titled "A Sestina for January 20, 2017", by Lanna Michaels, recommended by a friend.

Date: 2017-01-23 05:30 pm (UTC)
elynross: (Default)
From: [personal profile] elynross
It's my bubblegum reading! It is about a murder cop, and I it occurs to me I should probably say that there are things I would warn for if asked; the main character has a background of being badly abused as a child, and it comes out in her dreams in explicit ways (as she starts to feel safe enough to allow things to start working themselves out), and some of the murders are pretty explicit. So... in a strange way I still consider it light and frothy, only partly because I don't have any personal triggers in that area; it also has a lot of humor, and romance and deep positive emotions and wish-fulfillment type stuff. Anyway, I can give more details if any of that sounds like it might cause problems for anyone who's interested.

Date: 2017-01-25 03:28 pm (UTC)
elynross: (Default)
From: [personal profile] elynross
Exactly!

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